Practical Homesteading

In November 2008 I took the most radical step of my adult life to date.  When most Americans were feeling lucky to be on the gainful side of labor statistics, I willingly left a good administrative job at Duke University.  Pregnant with my second child, I embarked on a journey into the wilds of a new frontier – my home.

At the time, I didn’t think of my move as revolutionary.  I knew only that I was exhausted and I came home to retreat from the stresses of modern American life, which expected me to maintain a full-time job as well as a household.  I certainly anticipated my home as place of solace and rest.  I never dreamed I’d also discover that it was a place of power and security.

Home is the ground from which we engage the external world.  It is at the filter called our front door that we decide with whom we will associate.  It is in our living rooms that we employ our own rules of behavior and choice of worship.  It is at our kitchen tables that we make sense of our daily experiences and formulate responses.  It is in our bedrooms that we select our sexual partners and practices.  In our homes, we are free to be ourselves wisely.

In today’s America, with society on the whole embracing government infiltration into every aspect of our lives, I am deeply concerned that this hotbed of liberty called the home is in danger.  I sense in the erosion of strict private property control a similar erosion of our freedoms of association and speech.  But after three years spent at home, I am also quite confident that all is not lost.

The restorative in this case seems quite simple: be liberty.

And I don’t mean anything major.  Seemingly small actions carry great import.  In the land where fast food is King, for example, cooking supper for my family from scratch becomes an act of rebellion.

In large measure, we are only as free as we allow ourselves to be.  Practical Homesteading is my collection of ordinary ideas for optimizing liberty in daily life.

© Jennifer S. and harvestliberty.net, 2011-2013.

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